PROJECT CATEGORY Project in Progress (March 2003)

FIRM Hammel, Green and Abrahamson, Inc. (HGA), (916) 787-5100

DESIGN TEAM Stephen Short, AIA, Principal; Jim Butler, AIA, Project Architect; Bill O'Malley, AIA, Project Manager; Bill Blanski, AIA, Design Architect

ILLUSTRATOR Al Forster

BED CAPACITY N/A

TOTAL BUILDING AREA (SQ. FT.) 136,000

TOTAL LAND AREA (ACRES) 12

TOTAL COST (EXCLUDING LAND) $28,000,000


The Institute for the Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (the M.I.N.D. Institute) was established in 1998 as part of the University of California at Davis Medical Center. The Institute's goals include implementing a multidisciplinary team approach to diagnostics, research and treatment. This multidisciplinary facility will allow for the development of better treatments for autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders and, ultimately, finding a cure. To fully realize its potential, the M.I.N.D. Institute needed a larger facility in which to continue its research. HGA developed a program narrative for the facility and created a functional design that includes a clinic, research laboratories, a resource center and a laboratory school in which to test treatments.

The Campus Plan was crafted to facilitate the collaborative efforts of researchers, clinicians, educators and parents by providing inspiring places to meet and discuss work, thus encouraging interaction.

Treating children with autism requires a comfortable environment for them and their families. The Master Plan includes a courtyard and loggias with a monastic feel. Patients will be sheltered from distraction, as will researchers, in an environment that is warm, inviting and full of hope. The atmosphere will provide a safe haven for children and families, but also will project a world-class image, emphasizing the importance of the work being done there.

The new 136,000-square-foot facility will include Dry Labs, Wet Labs, a Clinic, an Academic Building, a Resource Center, offices and a Laboratory School. The facility also will feature numerous Common Areas and a Lobby with artwork created by artists with neurodevelopmental disorders.

The loggias connecting the buildings are all on ground level and intersect at critical points, allowing for informal contact and exchange between different disciplines


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