Faced with an increased demand for early- to late-stage detection of heart disease, Saint Francis Hospital established a Cardiac Care Center to meet this growing need. The 600-bed hospital required in-patient diagnostic testing with the latest in cardiac imaging technology, while the community needed outpatient access to the noninvasive procedures provided by the facility. Combining these services offered a cost-effective modality in today's market.

Two points of access from within the hospital's primary entrance lobby and the hospital patient-bed-tower corridor presented an interesting challenge in patient management. The curvilinear reception desk and physicians' station were designed to draw the patients into the natural flow of movement through the facility. An extensive procedural analysis by the architect allowed the hospital to move more patients through the facility with less waiting.

The lighting package includes a combination of natural, direct and indirect soffit lighting to soften the mood and create a dramatic, noninstitutional appearance. Neutral and earthtone colors were selected for their warmth and the inviting atmosphere they create.

PROJECT CATEGORY Remodel/Renovation (completed April 2002)

CHIEF ADMINISTRATOR David Knight, Manager, (901) 765-1000

FIRM O.T. Marshall, Architects, (901) 386-0092

DESIGN TEAM Tom Marshall and O.T. Marshall, Partners; Allan Barner, Designer; Richard Davenport, Designer

PHOTOGRAPHY Alan Peeler

BED CAPACITY 6

TOTAL BUILDING AREA (SQ. FT.) 7,200

TOTAL LAND AREA N/A

TOTAL COST $2,400,000 (including equipment)

Architectural elements include semiprivate physicians' offices, with smoked-glass walls for private consultation with patients, and multiple built-in seating arrangements for multimodality processing. The physicians' station is strategically positioned for its direct sight lines to six of the procedure rooms, while built-in computer monitors provide simultaneous data displays for the entire facility.

Renovation of the existing cardiac unit required careful phasing of construction in order to minimize interference with ongoing procedures


.